TEXT   60

exim conf

Guest on 11th June 2022 05:38:10 PM

  1. # This is the main exim configuration file.
  2. # It was originally generated by `eximconfig', part of the exim package
  3. # distributed with Debian, but it may edited by the mail system administrator.
  4. # This file originally generated by eximconfig at Sat Apr
  5. # See exim info section for details of the things that can be configured here.
  6.  
  7. # Please see the manual for a complete list
  8. # of all the runtime configuration options that can be included in a
  9. # configuration file.
  10.  
  11. # This file is divided into several parts, all but the last of which are
  12. # terminated by a line containing the word "end". The parts must appear
  13. # in the correct order, and all must be present (even if some of them are
  14. # in fact empty). Blank lines, and lines starting with # are ignored.
  15.  
  16. ######################################################################
  17. #                    MAIN CONFIGURATION SETTINGS                     #
  18. ######################################################################
  19.  
  20. # Specify the domain you want to be added to all unqualified addresses
  21. # here. Unqualified addresses are accepted only from local callers by
  22. # default. See the receiver_unqualified_{hosts,nets} options if you want
  23. # to permit unqualified addresses from remote sources. If this option is
  24. # not set, the primary_hostname value is used for qualification.
  25.  
  26. qualify_domain =
  27.  
  28. # If you want unqualified recipient addresses to be qualified with a different
  29. # domain to unqualified sender addresses, specify the recipient domain here.
  30. # If this option is not set, the qualify_domain value is used.
  31.  
  32. # qualify_recipient =
  33.  
  34. # Specify your local domains as a colon-separated list here. If this option
  35. # is not set (i.e. not mentioned in the configuration file), the
  36. # qualify_recipient value is used as the only local domain. If you do not want
  37. # to do any local deliveries, uncomment the following line, but do not supply
  38. # any data for it. This sets local_domains to an empty string, which is not
  39. # the same as not mentioning it at all. An empty string specifies that there
  40. # are no local domains; not setting it at all causes the default value (the
  41. # setting of qualify_recipient) to be used.
  42.  
  43. local_domains = dmprojects.com:localhost:srv
  44.  
  45. # Allow mail addressed to our hostname, or to our IP address.
  46.  
  47. local_domains_include_host = true
  48. local_domains_include_host_literals = true
  49.  
  50. # Domains we relay for; that is domains that aren't considered local but we
  51. # accept mail for them.
  52.  
  53. #relay_domains =
  54.  
  55. # If this is uncommented, we accept and relay mail for all domains we are
  56. # in the DNS as an MX for.
  57.  
  58. #relay_domains_include_local_mx = true
  59.  
  60. # No local deliveries will ever be run under the uids of these users (a colon-
  61. # separated list). An attempt to do so gets changed so that it runs under the
  62. # uid of "nobody" instead. This is a paranoic safety catch. Note the default
  63. # setting means you cannot deliver mail addressed to root as if it were a
  64. # normal user. This isn't usually a problem, as most sites have an alias for
  65. # root that redirects such mail to a human administrator.
  66.  
  67. never_users = root
  68.  
  69. # The setting below causes Exim to do a reverse DNS lookup on all incoming
  70. # IP calls, in order to get the true host name. If you feel this is too
  71. # expensive, you can specify the networks for which a lookup is done, or
  72. # remove the setting entirely.
  73.  
  74. host_lookup = *
  75.  
  76. # The setting below would, if uncommented, cause Exim to check the syntax of
  77. # all the headers that are supposed to contain email addresses (To:, From:,
  78. # etc). This reduces the level of bounced bounces considerably.
  79.  
  80. # headers_check_syntax
  81.  
  82. # Exim contains support for the Realtime Blocking List (RBL), and the many
  83. # similar services that are being maintained as part of the DNS. See
  84. # http://www.mail-abuse.org/ for background. The line below, if uncommented,
  85. # will reject mail from hosts in the RBL, and add warning headers to mail
  86. # from hosts in a list of dynamic-IP dialups. Note that MAPS may charge
  87. # for this service.
  88.  
  89. #rbl_domains = rbl.mail-abuse.org/reject : dialups.mail-abuse.org/warn
  90.  
  91. # http://www.rfc-ignorant.org is another interesting site with a number of
  92. # services you can use with the rbl_domains option
  93.  
  94. # The setting below allows your host to be used as a mail relay by only
  95. # the hosts in the specified networks. See the section of the manual
  96. # entitled "Control of relaying" for more info.
  97.  
  98. host_accept_relay = 127.0.0.1 : ::::1 : 192.168.0.0/24
  99.  
  100. # This setting allows anyone who has authenticated to use your host as a
  101. # mail relay. To use this you will need to set up some authenticators at
  102. # the end of the file
  103.  
  104. host_auth_accept_relay = *
  105.  
  106. # If you want Exim to support the "percent hack" for all your local domains,
  107. # uncomment the following line. This is the feature by which mail addressed
  108. # to x%y@z (where z is one of your local domains) is locally rerouted to
  109. # x@y and sent on. Otherwise x%y is treated as an ordinary local part
  110.  
  111. # percent_hack_domains=*
  112.  
  113. # If this option is set, then any process that is running as one of the
  114. # listed users may pass a message to Exim and specify the sender's
  115. # address using the "-f" command line option, without Exim's adding a
  116. # "Sender" header.
  117.  
  118. trusted_users = mail
  119.  
  120. # If this option is true, the SMTP command VRFY is supported on incoming
  121. # SMTP connections; otherwise it is not.
  122.  
  123. smtp_verify = true
  124.  
  125. # Some operating systems use the "gecos" field in the system password file
  126. # to hold other information in addition to users' real names. Exim looks up
  127. # this field when it is creating "sender" and "from" headers. If these options
  128. # are set, exim uses "gecos_pattern" to parse the gecos field, and then
  129. # expands "gecos_name" as the user's name. $1 etc refer to sub-fields matched
  130. # by the pattern.
  131.  
  132. gecos_pattern = ^([^,:]*)
  133. gecos_name = $1
  134.  
  135. # This sets the maximum number of messages that will be accepted in one
  136. # connection and immediately delivered. If one connection sends more
  137. # messages than this, any further ones are accepted and queued but not
  138. # delivered. The default is 10, which is probably enough for most purposes,
  139. # but is too low on dialup SMTP systems, which often have many more mails
  140. # queued for them when they connect.
  141.  
  142. smtp_accept_queue_per_connection = 100
  143.  
  144. # Send a mail to the postmaster when a message is frozen. There are many
  145. # reasons this could happen; one is if exim cannot deliver a mail with no
  146. # return address (normally a bounce) another that may be common on dialup
  147. # systems is if a DNS lookup of a smarthost fails. Read the documentation
  148. # for more details: you might like to look at the auto_thaw option
  149.  
  150. freeze_tell_mailmaster = true
  151.  
  152. # This string defines the contents of the \`Received' message header that
  153. # is added to each message, except for the timestamp, which is automatically
  154. # added on at the end, preceded by a semicolon. The string is expanded each
  155. # time it is used.
  156.  
  157. received_header_text = "Received: \
  158.          ${if def:sender_rcvhost {from ${sender_rcvhost}\n\t}\
  159.          {${if def:sender_ident {from ${sender_ident} }}\
  160.          ${if def:sender_helo_name {(helo=${sender_helo_name})\n\t}}}}\
  161.          by ${primary_hostname} \
  162.          ${if def:received_protocol {with ${received_protocol}}} \
  163.          (Exim ${version_number} #${compile_number} (Debian))\n\t\
  164.          id ${message_id}\
  165.          ${if def:received_for {\n\tfor <$received_for>}}"
  166.  
  167. # Attempt to verify recipient address before receiving mail, so that mails
  168. # to invalid addresses are rejected rather than accepted and then bounced.
  169. # Apparently some spammers are abusing servers that accept and then bounce
  170. # to send bounces containing their spam to people.
  171.  
  172. receiver_try_verify = true
  173.  
  174. # This would make exim advertise the 8BIT-MIME option. According to
  175. # RFC1652, this means it will take an 8bit message, and ensure it gets
  176. # delivered correctly. exim won't do this: it is entirely 8bit clean
  177. # but won't do any conversion if the next hop isn't. Therefore, if you
  178. # set this option you are asking exim to lie and not be RFC
  179. # compliant. But some people want it.
  180.  
  181. #accept_8bitmime = true
  182.  
  183. # This will cause it to accept mail only from the local interface
  184.  
  185. #local_interfaces = 127.0.0.1
  186.  
  187. # If this next line is uncommented, any user can see the mail queue
  188. # by using the mailq command or exim -bp.
  189.  
  190. #queue_list_requires_admin = false
  191.  
  192. #
  193. end
  194.  
  195.  
  196. ######################################################################
  197. #                      TRANSPORTS CONFIGURATION                      #
  198. ######################################################################
  199. #                       ORDER DOES NOT MATTER                        #
  200. #     Only one appropriate transport is called for each delivery.    #
  201. ######################################################################
  202.  
  203. # This transport is used for local delivery to user mailboxes. On debian
  204. # systems group mail is used so we can write to the /var/spool/mail
  205. # directory. (The alternative, which most other unixes use, is to deliver
  206. # as the user's own group, into a sticky-bitted directory)
  207.  
  208. local_delivery:
  209.   driver = appendfile
  210.   group = mail
  211.   mode = 0660
  212.   mode_fail_narrower = false
  213.   envelope_to_add = true
  214.   return_path_add = true
  215.   file = /var/spool/mail/${local_part}
  216.  
  217. # This transport is used for handling pipe addresses generated by
  218. # alias or .forward files. If the pipe generates any standard output,
  219. # it is returned to the sender of the message as a delivery error. Set
  220. # return_fail_output instead if you want this to happen only when the
  221. # pipe fails to complete normally.
  222.  
  223. address_pipe:
  224.   driver = pipe
  225.   path = /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/bin
  226.   return_output
  227.  
  228. # This transport is used for handling file addresses generated by alias
  229. # or .forward files.
  230.  
  231. address_file:
  232.   driver = appendfile
  233.   envelope_to_add = true
  234.   return_path_add = true
  235.  
  236. # This transport is used for handling file addresses generated by alias
  237. # or .forward files if the path ends in "/", which causes it to be treated
  238. # as a directory name rather than a file name. Each message is then delivered
  239. # to a unique file in the directory. If instead you want all such deliveries to
  240. # be in the "maildir" format that is used by some other mail software,
  241. # uncomment the final option below. If this is done, the directory specified
  242. # in the .forward or alias file is the base maildir directory.
  243. #
  244. # Should you want to be able to specify either maildir or non-maildir
  245. # directory-style deliveries, then you must set up yet another transport,
  246. # called address_directory2. This is used if the path ends in "//" so should
  247. # be the one used for maildir, as the double slash suggests another level
  248. # of directory. In the absence of address_directory2, paths ending in //
  249. # are passed to address_directory.
  250.  
  251. address_directory:
  252.   driver = appendfile
  253.   no_from_hack
  254.   prefix = ""
  255.   suffix = ""
  256. # maildir_format
  257.  
  258. # This transport is used for handling autoreplies generated by the filtering
  259. # option of the forwardfile director.
  260.  
  261. address_reply:
  262.   driver = autoreply
  263.  
  264. # This transport is used for procmail
  265.  
  266. procmail_pipe:
  267.   driver = pipe
  268.   command = "/usr/bin/procmail"
  269.   return_path_add
  270.   delivery_date_add
  271.   envelope_to_add
  272. # check_string = "From "
  273. # escape_string = ">From "
  274.   suffix = ""
  275.  
  276.  
  277. # This transport is used for delivering messages over SMTP connections.
  278.  
  279. remote_smtp:
  280.   driver = smtp
  281. # authenticate_hosts = smarthost.isp.com
  282.  
  283. # To use SMTP AUTH when sending to a particular host, such as your ISP's
  284. # smarthost, uncomment and edit the above line, and also the example
  285. # client-side authenticators at the bottom of the file
  286.  
  287. end
  288.  
  289.  
  290. ######################################################################
  291. #                      DIRECTORS CONFIGURATION                       #
  292. #             Specifies how local addresses are handled              #
  293. ######################################################################
  294. #                          ORDER DOES MATTER                         #
  295. #   A local address is passed to each in turn until it is accepted.  #
  296. ######################################################################
  297.  
  298. # This allows local delivery to be forced, avoiding alias files and
  299. # forwarding.
  300.  
  301. real_local:
  302.   prefix = real-
  303.   driver = localuser
  304.   transport = local_delivery
  305.  
  306. # This director handles aliasing using a traditional /etc/aliases file.
  307. # If any of your aliases expand to pipes or files, you will need to set
  308. # up a user and a group for these deliveries to run under. You can do
  309. # this by uncommenting the "user" option below (changing the user name
  310. # as appropriate) and adding a "group" option if necessary.
  311.  
  312. system_aliases:
  313.   driver = aliasfile
  314.   file_transport = address_file
  315.   pipe_transport = address_pipe
  316.   file = /etc/aliases
  317.   search_type = lsearch
  318. # user = list
  319. # Uncomment the above line if you are running smartlist
  320.  
  321.  
  322. # This director handles forwarding using traditional .forward files.
  323. # It also allows mail filtering when a forward file starts with the
  324. # string "# Exim filter": to disable filtering, uncomment the "filter"
  325. # option. The check_ancestor option means that if the forward file
  326. # generates an address that is an ancestor of the current one, the
  327. # current one gets passed on instead. This covers the case where A is
  328. # aliased to B and B has a .forward file pointing to A.
  329.  
  330. # For standard debian setup of one group per user, it is acceptable---normal
  331. # even---for .forward to be group writable. If you have everyone in one
  332. # group, you should comment out the "modemask" line. Without it, the exim
  333. # default of 022 will apply, which is probably what you want.
  334.  
  335. userforward:
  336.   driver = forwardfile
  337.   file_transport = address_file
  338.   pipe_transport = address_pipe
  339.   reply_transport = address_reply
  340.   no_verify
  341.   check_ancestor
  342.   check_local_user
  343.   file = .forward
  344.   modemask = 002
  345.   filter
  346.  
  347. # This director runs procmail for users who have a .procmailrc file
  348.  
  349. procmail:
  350.   driver = localuser
  351.   transport = procmail_pipe
  352.   require_files = ${local_part}:+${home}:+${home}/.procmailrc:+/usr/bin/procmail
  353.   no_verify
  354.    
  355. # This director matches local user mailboxes.
  356.  
  357. localuser:
  358.   driver = localuser
  359.   transport = local_delivery
  360.  
  361. end
  362.  
  363.  
  364. ######################################################################
  365. #                      ROUTERS CONFIGURATION                         #
  366. #            Specifies how remote addresses are handled              #
  367. ######################################################################
  368. #                          ORDER DOES MATTER                         #
  369. #  A remote address is passed to each in turn until it is accepted.  #
  370. ######################################################################
  371.  
  372. # Remote addresses are those with a domain that does not match any item
  373. # in the "local_domains" setting above.
  374.  
  375. # This router routes to remote hosts over SMTP using a DNS lookup with
  376. # default options.
  377.  
  378. lookuphost:
  379.   driver = lookuphost
  380.   transport = remote_smtp
  381.  
  382. # This router routes to remote hosts over SMTP by explicit IP address,
  383. # given as a "domain literal" in the form [nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn]. The RFCs
  384. # require this facility, which is why it is enabled by default in Exim.
  385. # If you want to lock it out, set forbid_domain_literals in the main
  386. # configuration section above.
  387.  
  388. literal:
  389.   driver = ipliteral
  390.   transport = remote_smtp
  391.  
  392. end
  393.  
  394.  
  395. ######################################################################
  396. #                      RETRY CONFIGURATION                           #
  397. ######################################################################
  398.  
  399. # This single retry rule applies to all domains and all errors. It specifies
  400. # retries every 15 minutes for 2 hours, then increasing retry intervals,
  401. # starting at 2 hours and increasing each time by a factor of 1.5, up to 16
  402. # hours, then retries every 8 hours until 4 days have passed since the first
  403. # failed delivery.
  404.  
  405. # Domain               Error       Retries
  406. # ------               -----       -------
  407.  
  408. *                      *           F,2h,15m; G,16h,2h,1.5; F,4d,8h
  409.  
  410. end
  411.  
  412.  
  413. ######################################################################
  414. #                      REWRITE CONFIGURATION                         #
  415. ######################################################################
  416.  
  417.  
  418. # There are no rewriting specifications in this default configuration file.
  419.  
  420.  
  421. # This rewriting rule is particularly useful for dialup users who
  422. # don't have their own domain, but could be useful for anyone.
  423. # It looks up the real address of all local users in a file
  424.  
  425. *@dmprojects.com    ${lookup{$1}lsearch{/etc/email-addresses}\
  426.                                                 {$value}fail} frFs
  427.  
  428. end
  429.  
  430. ######################################################################
  431. #                   AUTHENTICATION CONFIGURATION                     #
  432. ######################################################################
  433.  
  434. # Look in the documentation (in package exim-doc or exim-doc-html for
  435. # information on how to set up authenticated connections.
  436.  
  437. # The examples below are for server side authentication; they allow two
  438. # styles of plain-text authentication against an /etc/exim/passwd file
  439. # which should have user IDs in the first column and crypted passwords
  440. # in the second.
  441.  
  442. # plain:
  443. #   driver = plaintext
  444. #   public_name = PLAIN
  445. #   server_condition = "${if crypteq{$2}{${extract{1}{:}{${lookup{$1}lsearch{/etc/exim/passwd}{$value}{*:*}}}}}{1}{0}}"
  446. #   server_set_id = $1
  447. #
  448. # login:
  449. #   driver = plaintext
  450. #   public_name = LOGIN
  451. #   server_prompts = "Username:: : Password::"
  452. #   server_condition = "${if crypteq{$2}{${extract{1}{:}{${lookup{$1}lsearch{/etc/exim/passwd}{$value}{*:*}}}}}{1}{0}}"
  453. #   server_set_id = $1
  454.  
  455. # These examples below are the equivalent for client side authentication.
  456. # They assume that you only use client side authentication to connect to
  457. # one host (such as a smarthost at your ISP), or else use the same user
  458. # name and password everywhere
  459.  
  460. # plain:
  461. #   driver = plaintext
  462. #   public_name = PLAIN
  463. #   client_send = "^username^password"
  464. #
  465. # login:
  466. #   driver = plaintext
  467. #   public_name = LOGIN
  468. #   client_send = ": username : password"
  469. #
  470. # cram_md5:
  471. #   driver = cram_md5
  472. #   public_name = CRAM-MD5
  473. #   client_name = username
  474. #   client_secret = password
  475.  
  476. # End of Exim configuration file

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