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Backup.txt Guest on 30th May 2020 08:21:37 PM
  1. Note:   This program has no attribution for authorship.  I modified it
  2.         to deal with binary files.
  3.  
  4.         Bob Supnik
  5.        
  6. Description:
  7.  
  8.         backup is a program that can list the contents of, and extract
  9.         files from a TOPS-10 backup tape.  The command syntax is some-
  10.         what resembling that of tar.  The command
  11.  
  12.                 backup -t[v][f tape]
  13.  
  14.         lists the contents of 'tape'.  The command
  15.  
  16.                 backup -x[cdimv8][f tape] file1 file2 ...
  17.  
  18.         extracts all files that match either of the file arguments given.
  19.        
  20.         The names used for the created files will be the canonical names
  21.         from the tape, unless -d or -i are in effect.  The canonical name
  22.         is a string of the format: device.p_pn.sfd1.sfd2..file.ext
  23.  
  24. Arguments:
  25.  
  26.         'tape' is the name of a tape drive, the name of a file or the
  27.         single character '-', meaning stdin.  If omitted, the environment
  28.         variable TAPE will be consulted.
  29.  
  30.  
  31.         If the "tape" argument is actually a file, which was captured
  32.         from a tape (say, on a different machine).  The "known good" way
  33.         to capture the contents of the tape is to use the unix utility
  34.         "dd", and a command line something like this:
  35.  
  36.            dd if=/dev/rmt0 of=data ibs=2720 obs=2720 conv=block
  37.  
  38.         the key thing is that this program expects a fixed block size of
  39.         2720 bytes.  If the tape actually has some other format, this
  40.         program probably won't succeed.  You can use the unix utility "tcopy"
  41.         to inspect the contents of the tape.
  42.  
  43.            Here's the tcopy output from a good tape:
  44.  
  45.            tcopy /dev/rmt0
  46.            file 0: block size 2720: 9917 records
  47.            file 0: eof after 9917 records: 26974240 bytes
  48.            eot
  49.            total length: 26974240 bytes
  50.  
  51.  
  52.         File arguments are either any substring of the canonical name
  53.         printed with 'backup -t ...', or a hash mark, and the number
  54.         of the file on the tape, or "*" to simply extract all the files.
  55.  
  56. Options:
  57.  
  58.    -b   Extract files in binary format.  The files on tape have one
  59.         36b word stored in five 8b frames, as specified in PDP-10
  60.         "core dump" mode.  The extracted files have one 36b word
  61.         stored, right justified, on one little-endian 64b word, as
  62.         expected by the simh simulators.
  63.  
  64.    -c   The 'tape' is a disk file, in copytape format.
  65.  
  66.    -d   Create a directory structure when restoring, giving files named
  67.         device:p_pn/sfd1/sfd2/file.ext, instead of the flat name space
  68.         resulting from using the canonical names.
  69.  
  70.    -f   The disk image file is the next argument.
  71.  
  72.    -i   Ignore device and directory info when building output file names.
  73.  
  74.    -m   The disk image file has a 4 byte header specifying density, which
  75.         must be ignored.
  76.  
  77.    -v   Verbose.  Does the obvious.  -vv does even more.
  78.  
  79.    -8   Tops-10 file was in eight-bit mode.
  80.  
  81.  
  82. Bugs:
  83.  
  84.         We don't handle multiple tape savesets any good.
  85.  
  86.         We don't check for bad format of input.
  87.  
  88.         We don't handle checksums, or repeated blocks any good.

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